97% Of Landlords We Contact Never Go To Court With Us

Security Deposit Refund Dispute



HOW DOES IT WORK?


APPLY- It starts with a simple application. If you haven't already applied then we suggest you do it now. You can apply here. The faster you apply the faster your will get your security deposit refund.

LOGIN - After your application is submitted you will get a welcome email with your Security Deposit Refund Tracker login information.

COMMUNICATE - From the Refund Tracker our team can instant message you and you can do the same. You can also upload any additional documents that we might need like a lease or a receipt.

GET PROGRESS UPDATES - The Refund Tracker has a progress update system. You can actually see your dispute progress as well as any and all letters, documents, complaints or any other action or communication related to your dispute.

GET YOUR CHECK - The day we get your security deposit back, you will be notified by email from the Refund Tracker. You will find out exactly how much your landlord refunded back. We will send out your check the very next day. Sometimes your check will be sent the same day.

Things you should know

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  • 97% Of Landlords That We Contact Never Go To Court

    Our collection process is direct, to the point, and convincing. Landlords get the message that we don't waste time. We act swiftly and within the law to show them why they are wrong and how much it will cost them if they go to court with us. To go to court for a security deposit. The attorney fees on either side costs more then the deposit. Landlords quickly come to the realization that if they go to court with us, they are going to be paying out a lot more. The reason is that the landlord must pay our fees as well as court costs and the full amount of the deposit. In some cases even more.

Why choose us over other firms?

We are specialists in recovering security deposits. It is the only service we offer.

  • Every legal means necessary
  • Swift action against Landlords
  • We have a 99% success rate
  • Most landlords pay in three weeks
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How long does my landlord have to return my deposit?

Alabama = 35 days after termination of tenancy and delivery of possession
Alaska = 14 days if the tenant gives proper notice to terminate tenancy; 30 days if the tenant does not give proper notice
Arizona = 14 days
Arkansas = 60 days
California = 21 days
Colorado = One month, unless lease agreement specifies longer period of time (which may be no more than 60 days); 72 hours (not counting weekends or holidays) if a hazardous condition involving gas equipment requires tenant to vacate
Connecticut = 30 days, or within 15 days of receiving tenant's forwarding address, whichever is later
Delaware = 20 days
District of Columbia = 45 days
Florida = 15 to 60 days depending on whether tenant disputes deductions
Georgia = One month
Hawaii = 14 days
Idaho = 21 days, or up to 30 days if landlord and tenant agree
Illinois = For properties with five or more units, 30 to 45 days, depending on whether tenant disputes deductions or if statement and receipts are furnished
Indiana = 45 days
Iowa = 30 days
Kansas = 30 days
Kentucky = 30-60 days, depending on whether tenant disputes deductions
Louisiana = One month
Maine = 30 days (if written rental agreement) or 21 days (if tenancy at will)
Maryland = 45 days
Massachusetts = 30 days
Michigan = 30 days
Minnesota = Three weeks after tenant leaves, and landlord receives mailing address; five days if tenant must leave due to building condemnation
Mississippi = 45 days
Missouri = 30 days
Montana = 30 days (10 days if no deductions)
Nebraska = 14 days
Nevada = 30 days
New Hampshire = 30 days; for shared facilities, if the deposit is more than 30 days' rent, landlord must provide written agreement acknowledging receipt and specifying when deposit will be returned -- if no written agreement, 20 days after tenant vacates
New Jersey = 30 days; five days in case of fire, flood, condemnation, or evacuation; does not apply to owner-occupied building with two or fewer units where tenant fails to provide 30 days' written notice to landlord invoking provisions of act
New Mexico = 30 days
New York = Reasonable time
North Carolina = 30 days; if landlord's claim against the deposit cannot be finalized within that time, landlord may send an interim accounting and a final accounting within 60 days of the tenancy's termination
North Dakota = 30 days
Ohio = 30 days
Oklahoma = 30 days
Oregon = 31 days
Pennsylvania = 30 days
Rhode Island = 20 days
South Carolina 30 days
South Dakota = Two weeks, and must supply reasons if withholding any portion; 45 days for a written, itemized accounting, if tenant requests it
Tennessee = No statutory deadline to return; 10 days to itemize
Texas = 30 days
Utah = 30 days, or within 15 days of receiving tenant's forwarding address, whichever is later, but if there is damage to the premises, 30 days
Vermont = 14 days; 60 days if the rental is seasonal and not intended as the tenant's primary residence
Virginia = 45 days
Washington = 14 days
West Virginia = 60 days from the date the tenancy has terminated, or within 45 days of the occupancy of a subsequent tenant, whichever is shorter. If the damage exceeds the amount of the security deposit and the landlord has to hire a contractor to fix it, the notice period is extended 15 days. Applies only to rental agreements entered into on or after June 10, 2011.
Wisconsin = 21 days
Wyoming = 30 days, when applying it to unpaid rent (or within 15 days of receiving tenant's forwarding address, whichever is later); additional 30 days allowed for deductions due to damage